Tag: Nigeria

Alex Ekwueme: Asking the Wrong Questions

Alex Ekwueme: Asking the Wrong Questions

In his book, Gravity’s Rainbow, Thomas Pynchon added a thought-provoking quote: “If they can get you asking the wrong questions, they don’t have to worry about answers.” Getting citizens to look at the wrong places has been a key operating principle for governments around the world disinterested in true accountability nor doing right by their citizens. Trying to get at a problem without asking the right questions is like trying to diagnose pregnancy by asking if a mosquito recently bit a lady. Unfortunately, Nigerians flirt with such irrelevant questioning.  Continue reading “Alex Ekwueme: Asking the Wrong Questions”

A Tale of a Corrupt Saint

A Tale of a Corrupt Saint

What better quote to start this article than one by Vladimir Putin: “Those who fight corruption should be clean themselves.” In case you’re wondering if this was said by the famous (or infamous) Russian president, allow me to calm your nerves. Even I hoped this Putin is the Putin we love to hate, and alas he is the author of this starter quote. I think Putin preaching against corruption is like a beautiful oxymoron. That’s why this quote launches today’s article about Nigeria’s corrupt saint.  Continue reading “A Tale of a Corrupt Saint”

Another Independence Day

Another Independence Day

Here we are again at another start to the month of October. For most people around the world, October is just the first day of the tenth month for each year, but in Nigeria, it is a day to mark the country’s shift from a colonial serfdom to an independent entity. Go throughout the length and breadth of Nigeria and the views of Nigerians would likely range from intense optimism to resigned dejection. On my part, herein lies my own view.  Continue reading “Another Independence Day”

Celebrating 100 Days of Excuses

Celebrating 100 Days of Excuses

“Beware of the leaven of the Pharisees, which is hypocrisy … therefore all that they tell you, do and observe, but do not do according to their deeds; for they say things and do not do them.”

  • Jesus Christ (Luke 12:1 + Matthew 23:2)

In writing this article, I understand that some persons’ sensibilities would be offended; maybe a little more than some. Yet, I choose to write because we cannot continue to shy away from important issues that affect Nigeria’s existence. During the 2015 general elections campaign, the then General Muhammadu Buhari pledged to ban medical tourism by government officials. Today, we are celebrating 100 straight days of President Buhari’s sojourn in London, his second trip this year.  Continue reading “Celebrating 100 Days of Excuses”

Biafra and the Knifing Calls

Biafra and the Knifing Calls

In recent times, the Nigerian polity has been flooded with secession calls by Nnamdi Kanu’s organisation, the Indigenous People of Biafra (IPOB). Kanu’s request has been quite clear: take a knife, carve out Nigeria’s “Biafra region” and let it become an independent nation. In the midst of debates on what areas constitute the requested Biafra, secession calls have also come from other parts of the country. Apparently, many persons are tired of Nigeria’s present composition and feel a divorce is the best way forward.  Continue reading “Biafra and the Knifing Calls”

Another Lateness-triggered Rant

Another Lateness-triggered Rant

A quote attributed to Shakespeare says “Better three hours too soon than a minute too late.” If Shakespeare had lived in contemporary times, I may have been inclined to believe this quote may have been inspired by an encounter with chronic latecomers. Google “African time” and the results would show a shameful habit that has become accepted by many Africans, especially those from the country called Nigeria. 

Continue reading “Another Lateness-triggered Rant”

Two Years of Real Democracy

Two Years of Real Democracy

For today’s article marking Nigeria’s “Democracy Day”, a quote by Michelle Hodkin should provide a suitable explanatory introduction. The quote goes thus: “Thinking something does not make it true. Wanting something does not make it real.”  Extending this, Philip Dick concisely says that “Reality is that which, when you stop believing in it, doesn’t go away.” Combining these two quotes, I believe there is a strong enough foundation for this essay. Let us begin.

Continue reading “Two Years of Real Democracy”